The Girl’s Guide to Witchcraft by Mindy Klasky

This book wasn’t quite what I was expecting. I enjoyed the story but didn’t like Jane much so I don’t know if I will finish the series.
First the book description:

Which is more unlikely? Meeting a single, straight, reasonably attractive, willing-to-commit man? Or discovering a secret cache of magic books? For good-girl Jane Madison, neither has a shot in hell of coming true — until the day she finds a hidden room!

Yep, that’s all of it from Goodreads. I’m so used to seeing three paragraph book descriptions that it’s strange to see a three sentence blurb.

Jane is a librarian at a historical library. She’s completely obsessed with one of her patrons who she refers to as her Imaginary Boyfriend. Even when they finally get involved she keeps calling him this. I’m pretty sure Klasky wrote Imaginary Boyfriend about a hundred times. Did I mention Jane is in her twenties? No one over the age of 14 should ever use the phrase Imaginary Boyfriend, especially a grown adult.

One day Jane finds out that her salary is getting cut. She freaks out to her boss that she can no longer afford her rent and her boss shares that there just happens to be a livable home behind the historical library that no one has been in for like a hundred years. But the electricity and all the plumbing still work. Uh huh.

Jane moves in and discovers a fully stocked room full of magical books and supplies that belonged to the previous owner. Instead of being excited like a normal person she completely freaks out. She’s completely terrified like there’s serial killer in the room. Finally after relaxing a bit, she reads a spell and awakens Neko, her familar, a gay man trapped in a cat statue who is part cat. I loved the character of Neko. Was it a little unbelievable that Jane would be cool with the insta live in gay best friend? Yeah but he’s a staple trope in chick lit, so…

The book was fun and funny for awhile as Jane does various spells and hijinks ensue. Jane is all “I don’t know if I want to be a witch and learn magic” which is frankly completely unbelievable. It’s not like she had to give up anything to do it. At one point it seemed like she was giving up because it was just too hard.

At the same time as all of this happens Jane learns that her mother really isn’t dead from her grandma. This aspect of the plot wasn’t bad, it just did not fit in with the I’m-suddenly-a-witch plot. I think if this part of the plot has been eliminated it would’ve made the book much better and not as long. It was absurd that this book was 426 pages!

What is even more absurd is Jane decides to invite her Imaginary Boyfriend to her family reunion after only two dates. No one in their right mind invites a man to meet their parents after two dates much less stay the entire weekend to meet the extended family. Since Jane barely knows her Imaginary Boyfriend she starts lying to everyone in her family about the details of his background. This plot trope has been done to death in sitcoms. To read about it in a paranormal chick lit was just unforgivable. Up until the lying I could tolerate Jane but I didn’t outright hate her.

In the end, Jane does mature some and sees the errors of her ways but you have to get through 400 pages before that happens. I would expect a far more mature character from an imprint of Harlequin. I suppose in all fairness I will give this series another chance and read the second book. However this book only gets . I will say I’ve been imagining some pretty great Neko meets Magnus Bane fanfiction in my head.